Thursday, 30 June 2011

A 'quilt' in the garden


Only a patchwork as yet. This is my version of the quilt labelled 'SarahWyatt' in the V & A's collection. Mine is made from 5in charm squares for the triangle squares, so the size is smaller than the original, so I compensated with a wider outer border. Most of the fabrics are by Moda, though I'm not sure about the wavy shirting stripe that borders the centre. As the triangle squares in the original are slightly different sizes in each section, I've kept that in my patchwork - while making them all the same size would be the easy option, IMHO it would destroy some of the naive charm of this quilt. Photographed in the arbour (if we get a dry weekend, I'll repaint it, but then I will loose a shabby chic photography location till it has weathered down again!)

The garden is looking very lush, if in need of a little taming.

4 comments:

Lis said...

When I saw your quilt it immediately looked like a quilt I saw today that was dated c. 1899 Have a look at my photo and see what you think, http://piecenpeace.blogspot.com/2011/06/wisbech-rose-festival.html

Susan Briscoe said...

Thanks for the link! Yes, assembling lots of triangle squares seems to have been popular right throughout the C19th. The way these quilts tend to put the smaller pieces/blocks in the centre and the larger ones on the outside is interesting, because you'd think (if they were being made from offcuts) you'd have the larger bits used up first. Or maybe the idea is to focus the veiwer on the middle?

Ann said...

I love this type of medallion quilt using the triangles (and squares). Reminds me that that's what I always thought patchwork was!

Susan Briscoe said...

Same here. Especially after recent events like the V & A museum exhibition, the opening of the Quilt Museum at York and the Welsh Quilt Centre at Lampeter, our British patchwork & quilting traditions have been in the spotlight over the last few years, reminding me that it was quilts like these (and their modern Japanese versions), with their very 'abstract art' qualities, that originally attracted me to quilting. I love the fact that, with a patchwork, you can be as abstract as you like but those same people who would feel alienated from the same level of abstraction in a painting can enjoy it as a quilt. Oh dear, now I'm turning into a philosopher!